Dr. Mauk’s Boomer Blog

/Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog

Each week, Dr. Mauk shares thoughts relevant to Baby Boomers that are aimed to educate and amuse.

Guest Blog:10 Signs Your Aging Loved One Needs Support at Home

Happy woman with elderly mother

It can be difficult to see your parent or relative age. At one time, he could do anything. Now, it seems as though age has gotten the best of him. If you’ve seen changes in your loved one due to age, he may need extra help at home. The following are some of the most common signs of someone who is in need of a nurse or senior caregiver.

#1: Unkempt Home
If there has been a drastic change in the way that your loved one keeps his home that may be a sign he lacks the energy or physical ability to pick up and clean. Extra support at home can ensure that your loved one lives in a healthy, safe environment.

#2: Missed Medications
Forgetfulness is common in older individuals. Missing medications can lead to withdrawal and the return of symptoms of medical problems. It can lead to more serious problems as well – stroke, heart attack, etc. Help at home can remind your loved one to take medications as prescribed.

#3: Missed or Canceled Medical Appointments
Forgetfulness and the inability to drive to appointments can lead to failing health. A senior care worker can provide transportation and encouragement to attend all medical appointments.

#4: Body Odor
Just as cleaning and picking up the home can be physically demanding, taking a shower or bath is too. With someone in the home, your loved one can get the assistance needed to get into the shower and out of it to keep him clean and feeling refreshed.

#5: Sudden Change in Weight
Medical problems can cause lost pounds, but not being able to cook healthy meals can be the reason as well. Since it can be difficult to cook when feeling tired or lacking energy, someone in the home can make sure that he has meals ready or set up a meal program that gets food delivered on a schedule.

#6: Problems with Mobility
Balance and walking can be hard as people age, and this can lead to falls causing serious injuries. Help with completing daily tasks can reduce the risk of falls.

#7: Confusion or Uncertainty
This can cause a lot of distress for your loved one. Have someone there to lend an ear or explain something that doesn’t make much sense can calm the anxiety of your loved one to improve his quality of life.

#8: Depression
Losing interests in hobbies or activities he used to enjoy could be a sign of depression that can lead to many other problems. Having a caregiver provide support and encouragement can help your loved one feel better or get the mental health he needs.

#9: Mail Piling Up or Unpaid Bills
It can be easy to forget to pay a bill from time to time, but if it becomes a habit, it might be a good idea to have someone help with going through mail and managing bills. This is one of the services that senior care workers provide in addition to helping with other daily tasks.

#10: Diagnosis of an Age-Related Medical Problem
Alzheimer’s or dementia can cause a loved one to forget or engage in risky behaviors. Having someone by your loved one’s side most of the day can help minimize the risk of him hurting himself.

Your parent or relative may have taken care of you for many years. Now, it’s your turn to care for him. Home care can help you do that. Look into the many options available if your loved one exhibits any of these symptoms.

About the Author:
Kendall Van Blarcom is a licensed marriage and family therapist providing personal consulting to seniors who need someone to talk with to improve the quality of their lives. More information can be found about personal consulting at http://www.kvanb.com.

By | 2017-07-31T13:09:42+00:00 August 5th, 2017|Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Guest Blog:10 Signs Your Aging Loved One Needs Support at Home

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: A Growing Trend

A Profile of Older Americans (2012) revealed that over 480,000 grandparents had primary parenting responsibility for their grandchildren who lived with them.  AARP cited that over 2.5 million grandparents are helping with the responsibility of raising their grandchildren, and 7.8 million children live in homes owned by their grandparents. These statistics represent a growing trend in American culture.

I have several friends who have raised or are raising their grandchildren in their own home. Some have formally adopted their grandchildren. Others share parenting responsibilities with one or both parents. All of them share the common feeling that this is a blessing, not a burden, but that raising grandchildren in later life does have its challenges.

Whatever the circumstances that brought grandchildren into the home of their grandparents to be raised, it can come as a shock to the older adults who find themselves in this situation.

Here are some beginning considerations to raising your grandchildren in your own home.

Impact of aging

Older adults who are assuming primary responsibility for children should “cut themselves some slack”. Don’t feel that you have to do everything as if you were a first-time parent in your 20’s. Remember that you may be parenting, but your body knows that you are still a grandparent. You may have to limit the children’s activities because keeping up with the driving and multiple schedules is too difficult. The good news is that many grandparents in this situation are retired, so both Grandma and Grandpa can help with the kids. This teamwork might not have been possible with your own children because one or both of you were working, but now you can share the duties such as driving kids to school or sports practices, helping with homework, and taking them to doctor appointments. If the children are school age, allow yourself extra time to rest and relax during the day so that after school you have the energy required for these new-again activities with the grandkids. If needed, enlist the help of other family members or friends to help by giving you a break on occasion.  Keep in mind that maintaining your own health is especially important if you have young ones depending on you.

Expenses and Education

Many older adults are on a fixed income and may not have planned to care for grandchildren. Your financial plan for retirement might need an overhaul with additional family members in the household. Several organizations have worked cooperatively to compile resources for grandparents in this situation. National and state fact sheets have been developed to link grandparents with key resources in their area. You can find out about resources available to help you at http://www.aarp.org/relationships/friends-family/grandfacts-sheets/ .These helpful fact sheets list local programs, public benefits, key state laws, and contact information for national resources. There may be funding or tax breaks to help with living or educational expenses.

Records and immunizations

It’s important to keep important documents together in one safe place. This includes birth certificates, legal papers, report cards, baptismal papers etc… Keeping a log or journal of important events is also a good strategy, especially when caring for multiple children. There are a number of immunizations for children today that were not available or required when you parented your own children. Immunizations are often free at your county health department, but can be very expensive at the doctor’s office. The health department can tell you what your child needs and when, and will help you by providing an immunization record that will need to be kept up for school. The CDC has a helpful chart of recommended immunizations for birth to 6 years that can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/parent-ver-sch-0-6yrs.pdf  A summary of vaccinations for birth to age 18 can be found at http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2010.pdf

Enjoy your Grand Family

Despite the obvious challenges of raising grandchildren in your older years, most grandparents describe the many joys that come with this new adventure. Grandparents share a special bond with their grandchildren, and when sharing a home together, that bond can be strengthened. Grandparents can share the wisdom of their experience with this younger generation and have the opportunity to shape their lives for the better. If you are new to this second round of parenting, AARP offers a helpful guide with tips to GrandFamilies, as they call them. These can be found at Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: A Growing Trend

 

 

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By | 2017-08-01T09:25:39+00:00 August 1st, 2017|Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: A Growing Trend

Guest Blog: Feeling forgetful? Tips to preserve your mental abilities as you get older

As you grow older, you are going to notice some changes in your brain’s ability to remember things. You go to the kitchen and cannot remember why, or keep forgetting where you place your keys. Sometimes, you miss an important appointment or a loved one’s birthday because it just slipped your mind. Memory lapses can occur at any age. However, as you grow older, you will find that the memory lapses keep increasing which will invariably upset you. Most people tend to relate memory loss with conditions such as dementia.

In some cases, memory loss may indicate such chronic illnesses. However, in most cases, it just reflects regular shifts in the functioning of the brain. Age tends to slow certain cognitive processes thus making it harder for an individual to learn new things and to get rid of distractions that tend to interfere with memory. While these changes may be frustrating, there is hope. Years of research and studies have yielded fruits. There are now certain things you can do to help keep your mind sharp and protect yourself from memory loss.

Stimulate your brain continuously

Sure, you got your degree years ago, got your dream job, married the love of your life and your life is seemingly amazing, you still need to keep learning. According to researchers, advanced education helps to keep your brain active and thus allows you to have a sharper memory. By being active intellectually, you can stimulate the communication among your brain cells. Going to school is not the only way to stimulate your brain, jigsaw puzzles, traveling around the world and learning a new dance can help you keep your mind active. If you have no idea what you can do to achieve this, play a video game. Studies have shown that computer-based brain exercises have managed to promote brain function by increasing the attention span, improving problem-solving, knowledge retention, reasoning and information processing. These studies showed that areas such as an executive control that were not targeted in the exercises also improved meaning that general cognitive health also enhanced through brain exercises.

Workout

The doctor always mentions that a healthy diet and regular exercises are what you need to stay healthy and active. Well, they are right. According to a review done in 2008 of more than 50 studies by Kirk Erickson and Arthur Kramer, your brain functions can improve when you engage in regular aerobic exercises. Of course, some people will not work out even if they know that it is good for their body. If you are one of those people, then do it for the sake of your cognitive health. The studies found that regular workouts improved brain functions such as multi-tasking, problem-solving and planning. Even the slightest exercises like a brisk walk twice or thrice a week over a six-month period will reveal great results. One of the studies reviewed showed that patients with early signs of Alzheimer’s disease who exercised regularly had less brain atrophy.

How does it work? Well, the brain’s neuroplasticity is improved by exercises. This means that the brain can grow new neural and blood flow pathways as a response to stimulation by learning new things and exercises. The higher the number of neural pathway reserves in the brain, the better it will be at handling strokes, head traumas and Alzheimer’s disease which are more likely as you grow older.

Use all your senses

If you are learning a new dance, concentrate all your senses into it. The more senses you use, the more active your brain will be in preserving the memory. A study was conducted to find out how memory retention worked. One group was shown images without any emotional implications, and another was shown images with scents associated with them. The pictures with odor were remembered by most of the participants. Therefore, ensure you engage all your senses even when speaking to nurses and friends at the stroke rehab home. It will go a long way in boosting your memory.

Conclusion

It is now possible for you to remember experiences without having to take medication. Learning how to take care of your general health will help stabilize your mental health.

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By | 2017-07-24T09:33:31+00:00 July 24th, 2017|Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Guest Blog: Feeling forgetful? Tips to preserve your mental abilities as you get older
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