Dan Easton

/Dan Easton

About Dan Easton

Director of Social Media – Senior Care Central, LLC

Clinical Nurse Specialist Profile – Dr. Kristen Mauk

Clinical Nurse Specialist Profile

Kristen Mauk has never been one to stop learning. The clinical nurse specialist has nearly 30 years of experience in rehabilitation and gerontology, a handful of degrees, and has authored or edited seven books. She now helps train the future generation as a professor of nursing at Colorado Christian University in Colorado. She also recently launched her own business, Senior Care Central/International Rehabilitation Consultants, which provides nursing and rehabilitation education throughout the world.

Question: What drew you to nursing? What do you enjoy about it?

Mauk: “I grew up in a medical family. My father was a pediatric surgeon and my mom was a nurse, so I was always around the healthcare professions. However, nursing offered so many opportunities for growth and change while doing what I loved — helping others. There are many aspects of nursing that I enjoy, but feeling like I help make peoples’ lives better has to be the best perk of the job. Nursing is a versatile profession. I started off my career as an operating room nurse, worked for a decade in med-surg, geriatrics, and rehabilitation, then eventually went back to school for additional education so that I could make a greater impact on healthcare through teaching nursing students.”

Question: You have an impressive education. Why did you continue to pursue advanced degrees in the field? How has that benefited you?

Mauk: “First, I am a life-long learner, something that was instilled by my father who was always encouraging his children to explore the world and have an inquiring mind. Dinners at my house were filled with learning activities such as, ‘How does a flashlight work?,’ ‘What is a group of lions called?,’ or ‘For $20, who can spell hors d’oeuvres?’ (By the way, I got that $20!) So, continuing my education through studying for advanced degrees seemed a natural progression when you love to learn and love your work. I felt a need to know as much as possible about my areas of interest, gerontology and rehabilitation, so that I could provide better care to patients and be a better teacher for my students. My advanced education has?opened many doors in the professional nursing world, such as the opportunity to write books, conduct research to improve the quality of life for stroke survivors, or hold national positions in professional organizations.”

Question: What’s one of the most memorable experiences you’ve had, either as a student, educator or in your practice?

Mauk: “There are many memorable experiences I’ve had both as an educator and in practice. One of the most memorable from practice was early in my career working on a skilled/rehab unit in a little country hospital in Iowa. There was an older man who couldn’t find a radio station that played his favorite hymns and one of my co-workers knew that I had a musical background and asked me to sing to him at the bedside. I timidly held his hand as he lay in his hospital bed, and with the door closed because it was late at night, I softly sang all the old hymns I could remember. He closed his eyes and smiled, clasping my hand for nearly an hour of singing. The next evening, I heard him excitedly tell his family members that ‘an angel visited me last night. She had the sweetest voice I’ve ever heard. She held my hand and sang all of my favorite hymns!’ Hearing that outside the door, I smiled, but was later surprised when I stopped in to see him that he truly didn’t seem to remember me. One day later, he died unexpectedly. I often look back and wonder on that experience. In the many years of nursing experience that followed, I have learned that there are sometimes angels where we least expect them.”

Question: What advice do you have for people just starting their education or their professional career?

Mauk: “Nursing is a great profession! Learn all that you can while you are in school and continue to be a lifelong learner. The need for nurses who specialize in care of older adults and rehabilitation is only going to continue to grow because of the booming aging population. There is currently, and will continue to be, a shortage of skilled professionals to meet the demand that is looming with the graying of America. Gain skills that will make you a specialist and afford you additional opportunities. Always give the best care to those you serve. Set yourself apart by building a professional reputation for excellence through advanced education, publication, scholarship, clinical practice, and community service. Then, go and change the world!”

CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST PROFILE FOR KRISTEN MAUK

Save

Save

Save

By | 2017-11-27T10:36:23+00:00 November 27th, 2017|News Posts|Comments Off on Clinical Nurse Specialist Profile – Dr. Kristen Mauk

Seniors: How to Cope and Manage Hearing Loss

bigstock-Four-Old-Friends-564417

Hearing loss is a disability that affects over 36 million American adults; 30 percent of those afflicted are 65-74 years old and 47 percent are 75 or older.

The Hearing Loss Association of America cites three types of hearing loss:

1.    Conductive hearing loss is due to ear canal, ear drum, or middle ear problems. Most causes of conductive hearing loss can be treated with surgery or hearing aids, particularly bone conductive hearing aids.
2.    Censorial hearing loss (nerve-related hearing loss) is due to inner ear problems. Depending upon the cause, treatments include medications or, in some cases, surgery.
3.    Mixed hearing loss is when there is damage in the outer or middle ear as well as the inner ear or auditory nerve. The conductive hearing loss is usually treated first, then the censorial.

Hearing loss can have a profound impact on our work and social interactions. People with this disability may experience depression and as a result, anger at others or withdrawal from occasions where their hearing loss will be noticeable. Unfortunately, there is no cure to hearing loss, although, there are effective ways to manage it and be proactive. Learn about your disability and seek assistance to help cope.

  • Hearing aids –Purchase your hearing aids from an auditory or medical professional who specializes in hearing, not someone who specializes in selling hearing aids. Hearing Denial suggests booking with ones that are able to offer evaluations and custom hearing aid fittings all within one supplier.
  • Cochlear implants – You will need an evaluation by an audiologist and an implant-affiliated physician to determine if you are eligible for cochlear implants.
  • Hearing Assistive Technology is available at most performing arts venues, including most movie theaters. Amplified and captioned phone systems, smoke detectors and doorbells are also available.

Responding to Others

Communication is still a two-way. There are ways you can help maintain your end of communication with others. Some suggestions include:

  • Do your best to focus and concentrate.
  • Admit it when you don’t understand.
  • Watch for visual clues and ask for written clues if necessary.
  • Maintain your sense of humor and positive attitude.

 

 

 

By | 2017-11-01T11:31:37+00:00 November 1st, 2017|Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Seniors: How to Cope and Manage Hearing Loss

Guest Blog: How Do Seniors With Alzheimer’s Handle Change?

bigstock-daughter-helping-her-senior-mo-25835828

When seniors develop diseases affecting cognition, like the various kinds of dementia, caregivers typically make an effort to make their living environment as safe and comfortable as possible.  Sometimes caregivers make lots of changes to a senior’s living space, with the best intentions of helping them.  However, this can have a two-sided effect, because seniors with mentally deteriorating illnesses can find change to be a confusing or frightening thing.  Caregivers might change the entire layout of a house, remove everything that could be a hazard, or add numerous locks to provide security.  Changes like these can actually prove to be disorienting for a senior, in addition to being helpful.  So the question becomes, how much change can seniors with Alzheimer’s handle?

 

It’s typical to find instances where seniors have lived in the same home for decades, and have a curious ability to navigate the living space with a sort of muscle memory after memory-harming diseases like Alzheimer’s set in.  Routine is very important to the delicate psyche of an elder with dementia, so finding the perfect balance of what to change for their own good can be tricky.  Making abrupt overwhelming makeovers to their home’s layout can make them flustered and end up actually making  it more difficult for them to get around, adding to their impaired cognition. So it is best to maintain an environment that is familiar as much as possible.  And make any alterations subtly and slowly over time.

 

The necessity to make changes will depend of the severity of a senior’s individual case.  If the Alzheimer’s is in the mid to late stages and a senior is wandering out of the home constantly, then immediate action to prevent hazard is surely appropriate.  Installing door alarms or adding locks can be great helps. If a senior with dementia typically kept a messy household, then the mess may add to their unease or make it easier to trip and fall.  De-cluttering their living space can be advantageous in these cases.

 

Thus, change will surely be necessary at times.  Though it is advisable to make changes as gradually and calmly as possible, to avoid overwhelming or distressing what was comfortable, normal, and assuring to the mind of a loved one with dementia.  Routine is key for security in these instances.  It may also be helpful to make sure you let them see when you move something, or set their things some place, to help then more easily adapt to the change.

 

By | 2017-07-31T13:10:24+00:00 August 9th, 2017|Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Guest Blog: How Do Seniors With Alzheimer’s Handle Change?
X
- Enter Your Location -
- or -