Resources

Resources 2016-12-16T23:03:20+00:00

Tips for Nursing Students: The Successful Interview

 

 

Job Interview Word Cloud Concept

The National League for Nursing and the National Students Nurses’ Association (NSNA)(2012) stated that “although there is a shortage of registered nurses, the economic recession has flooded the RN market with experienced nurses who were retired, planning to retire, or went from part-time to full-time employment. The need for RNs has declined due to low hospital census”. Nursing students graduating today face a competitive employment market. Much of your success at getting the position you want will depend on how well you interview for the job. Follow these steps to be better prepared and increase your chances for a successful interview.

Be prepared

Submit your resume and application in advance, but do not assume that the person interviewing you has read them carefully. Before the interview, think about how you can highlight important aspects of your experience or education.  Do some background research on the organization or place to which you are applying.

Familiarize yourself with the key people in authority, especially focusing on the person who will interview you. During the interview you can use this information to establish some common ground. Consider some key areas such as: How large is the organization and/or the unit where you are applying? What population and geographic area do they serve? What expertise do you have to offer that might be valuable to them? For example, if you are applying for a job on an inpatient rehabilitation unit, did you have a course in rehabilitation or do clinical rotations in rehab? If so, be sure to mention this during the interview.

Look professional

Paul Walden, writing on the NSNA website, stated, “appearance and attitude are everything. Dress in professional attire and smile. Make sure you arrive promptly”. Although professional attire may be more casual than it has been in years past, employers still expect an interviewee to look his/her best.  This means no blue jeans, shorts, cut-offs, flip-flops, low-cut blouses, miniskirts, overbearing jewelry, or other extremes in attire.  Business casual is usually acceptable, but when in doubt, err on the side of dressing more formally in business attire than casual.

Start with a good beginning

Introduce yourself and offer to shake hands with the interviewer while making direct eye contact. Do not sit down until directed to do so. The interviewer controls the interview. Express enthusiasm for the interviewer taking time to speak with you and make a positive comment about the surroundings or reputation of the facility. Smile and convey friendliness, approachability, and confidence. Most nurse managers are looking for a “good fit” in a new employee with their existing staff and unit milieu. Your personality may be as important to the manager as your skill set. Listen for comments made by the interviewer that suggest he/she is seeking someone who will be a team player and then be sure to share ways in which you have successfully blended with similar groups in the past.

Ask thoughtful questions

Have a few thoughtful questions ready to ask. For example: How does the open position fit within the organizational chart? Is there opportunity for gaining additional education? What type of orientation or mentoring do they provide for new nurses? Are there opportunities for advancement? These types of questions show that you are interested in a long-term relationship with the organization and are willing to learn and increase your professional skills. Asking deliberate questions can also help you assess whether or not this job is the right one for you.

Be memorable

You want the person conducting the interview to remember you in a positive light. What sets you apart from others who might be applying for this job? Answering that question in advance will point you in the direction where you need to shine. This might be your engaging personality, strong evaluations from clinical professors, your flexibility or willingness to learn, your experience in another country with service-learning projects, or your good academic performance.

End the interview well

If you were fortunate enough to be given a tour of the unit or facility, be sure to take advantage of any opportunities to greet or interact with staff or patients. The interviewer may be watching to see if you display positive interpersonal skills. Before you leave the interview, be sure that you know how you will be notified if they wish to hire you. Thank the interviewer and shake hands again (if appropriate), expressing your enthusiasm for this wonderful opportunity. If possible, send a follow-up email or thank you note to the interviewer for his/her time and attention. Be sure to continue to display warmth and cordiality as you leave the facility. You never know who may be watching.

See this article at StuNurse.com. Click on the link below:

http://www.digitaleditionsonline.com/publication/?i=157690&p=15

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By | April 12th, 2018|Categories: Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Tags: |Comments Off on Tips for Nursing Students: The Successful Interview

Keeping In Contact With Loved Ones Who Live Far Away

guidelines-for-introducing-use-of-technology-to-older-adults

Human contact is essential to our health and well-being, especially as we age. Lack of human contact has been associated with depression, loss of appetite, increased cognitive impairment, and even hypertension. Human contact is so important, in fact, that according to the National Institutes of Health, loneliness and isolation are predictors of “declining health and poor quality of life in the elderly.

As we age, it can be hard to maintain the social contacts we need, simply because health problems and mobility issues make reaching out to the community around us increasingly difficult. This makes interactions with loved ones that much more important. They can provide that essential human contact we all need to thrive.

Unfortunately, not every family enjoys the luxury of living close enough to their aging loved ones to visit as often as they would like. Do you live too far away from your loved one to provide the face-to-face contact he or she needs to stave off the effects of loneliness and isolation? Don’t worry. Below are three easy ways you can stay in touch with your elderly loved one, even when you live far away:

 

  • Make use of good, old-fashioned snail mail. Most of us don’t even think of sending a letter these days. After all, phone calls and text messages are right there at our fingertips and just so easy to use. However, many older people still remember when snail mail was the primary means of keeping in touch with friends and family far away, and they often love checking the mailbox every day, hoping to find a hand-written treasure. Consider sending letters and cards as a way of staying in touch with your loved one. Your messages don’t have to be long or complex. Even a quick, “Thinking of you!” can brighten your loved one’s day. Knowing that a letter might come in the mail will also give your loved one something to look forward to, and a reason to get dressed and out of the house — even if it’s just for a trip down the driveway to the mailbox.

 

  • Pick up the phone. Phone calls are a great way to connect with older loved ones. Not only will they be pleased to hear from you, but you will be able to check on their well-being by noticing how fast they answer the phone and listening to how they sound. Don’t plan to just try to call “when you can,” either. If you’re like most people with a busy life, that extra hour of time simply won’t materialize. Instead, make a “phone date” with your loved one: A specific day and time when you will call each week. Coordinate with other family members, as well. You can each call on a different day, so your loved one will get some needed attention throughout the week.

 

  • Don’t underestimate technology. Technology is not just for the young. According to the Pew Research Center, 56 percent of online users over age 65 have Facebook accounts, and 31 percent of all seniors use the Internet. If your loved one is comfortable with a computer, use it as a means to stay in touch. Send emails or short, cheerful text messages on a regular basis. Use Skype, as well, for a real face-to-face conversation. If your loved one has problems configuring or using computer technology, try to be sure he or she is set up with computer, camera and mic the next time you visit. You can also enlist the help of the younger generation. The grandkids could be asked to volunteer to be their grandparent’s own, private tech-support team, available over the phone to answer any computer questions or problems that arise.

Staying in touch doesn’t have to be complicated or time consuming; it just needs to be heartfelt. Taking the time to reach out to elderly loved ones is a simple gesture that will greatly improve their quality of life.

Author Bio: Michele Teter is the co-founder of Alliance Homecare, a home care provider located in the New York area. At Alliance Homecare, Teter and her team provide a range of services to match every client’s individual wants and needs.

 

 

 

 

 

By | April 11th, 2018|Categories: Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Keeping In Contact With Loved Ones Who Live Far Away

Guest Blog:Tips For Moving Senior Citizens

 

Moving from one home to another is seldom easy — in fact, it’s considered one of the most stressful life events people experience. However, the process can be especially tough for senior citizens. Whether you’re an older adult about to leave your long-term home or you’re the child of a senior getting ready to help a parent leave his/her home, here are some important tips to keep in mind:

  • Acknowledge Emotions. Anytime you’re talking about leaving a long-term home, you’re talking about more than changing addresses. Saying goodbye is hard. Instead of ignoring the sadness that accompanies such a move, process it. Remember, it’s normal to feel some sadness, whether you’re moving into an assisted-living facility, in with relatives or simply to a smaller place.
  • Pare Down Possessions. When it comes down to the physical moving process, the less you have to move, the easier the transition. Rather than packing every worldly possession and forcing yourself to organize later, take the time now to downsize. Go through all your furniture, knick-knacks, mementos, gadgets and so on, and determine whether you’ll truly need those items in the new place. Separate everything into “keep,” “give away” and “trash” piles. If you don’t want to hand down or donate certain items, plan a garage sale to get a little extra cash in the process.
  • Hire Professional Movers. Don’t endure unnecessary stress by managing the moving process alone — hire movers. Find a company that specializes in assisting with smooth transitions, and enlist its help to transport furniture and boxes to their intended destinations. If some things are going to a new home and others are going to friends and family, communicate to your moving company which items go where.
  • Pack an Overnight Bag. Set aside a few changes of clothes, important toiletries, towels and sheets to have with you for that first night or few nights in your new home. Instead of rifling through boxes and feeling overwhelmed with all there is to unpack, there will be a little normalcy — even when you’re still getting settled. Other good items to bring are a first-aid kit and flashlight.

Moving as a senior citizen isn’t easy, but it can be a smoother, more pleasant experience with a little planning. Use the tips above to aid your upcoming move.

Chris Crompton is a marketing manager for Transit Systems Inc., a leader in the shipping and freight industry since 1989. Transit Systems offers low rates and professional service on long distance small moves and shipments.

 

 

By | April 10th, 2018|Categories: Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Guest Blog:Tips For Moving Senior Citizens

Navigating Role Changes in the Grandparented Family

Needs of the child

An essential consideration in assigning terms of endearment is what is ultimately in the best interest of your child. I asked myself which was more important – that JJ have us as grandparents? or that he have a forever Mom and Dad? In our case, this was a simpler choice because JJ had plenty of other grandparents, Saunties, and Bruncles, but only one set of reliable parents who were part of his life. While we kept his original birth certificate, the county issued a new one that named us as his parents as if he had been born to us. One of our other adopted children suggested when JJ goes to school, it is more important that he and everyone else knows who his Mom and Dad are. Seemingly simple choices now can become of great importance later in his life.

Involvement of the birth parents

There are many situations in which grandparents care for their grandchildren, even formally adopting them, but the natural parents are still part of the child’s life. In cases like these, it is probably best to keep everyone’s titles the same in order to have less confusion for the child. However, if the birth parents are incarcerated, deceased, have ongoing substance abuse problems, have moved far away, do not ever see the child, or pose a danger or threat to the family, consider what is in the child’s best interest.

Wishes of the child or children

One Grandmother recently told me that when they adopted her grandson at a young age, her husband wanted to continue to be called Grandpa. However, as soon as their boy started to talk, he began to call Grandpa his Daddy, and soon after, Grandpa gave up and embraced his role as Dad along with the new name. What do your children want to call you? What do you want to be called? If they name you Mom or Dad, it is usually because this is how they see you. It is a term of great endearment that fills a need in their life. Names are important because they express relationships to us and others. Strongly weigh what your children prefer to call you and negotiate mutually respectful names for your unique family ties.

Wishes of the relatives

While other relatives cannot determine what your adopted grandchild will call you, relatives will also have some concerns about their changing relationships within this unique family system. Ask relatives what they would like to be called. Grandparents who continue to be part of your child’s life may have unique or cultural names that they prefer to be called so that the child recognizes them as special. Honor those wishes as much as you can. Even small choices as these can strengthen the family ties and provide your little one with the security he deserves.

So, in the land of Saunties and Bruncles there are many unfamiliar twists and turns. The list of difficult choices and tunnels off the rabbit hole on this strange journey will continue on. But, as you take one step at a time, you can successfully navigate your changing role in this new, wonderful family.

By | April 7th, 2018|Categories: Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Navigating Role Changes in the Grandparented Family

Guest Blog: Preventing Diabetes In Seniors

Prevent Diabetes mellitus type 2 in Seniors

The number of seniors diagnosed with diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 11.8 million individuals over age 65 have some form of diabetes, whether it is Type 1 or Type 2. That accounts for almost 25 percent of the population of people in the United States over age 65.

Just because this disease has reached an epidemic level doesn’t mean you have to accept that someday you will get it, too. There are a number of steps you can take to help decrease your chances of receiving a diabetes diagnosis.

 

Try to Increase Your Daily Amount of Exercise

Aches and pains, health problems and busy schedules often result in people starting to slow down as they age. Unfortunately, this is the worst thing you can do if you are trying to prevent diabetes.

Exercise reduces your risk of diabetes by not only lowering blood sugar levels, but by helping you lose weight. Both high blood sugar levels and being overweight has been proven to increase an individual’s risk of developing diabetes.

Many seniors are unsure of where to start when it comes to increasing exercise, especially if there has been a decrease in mobility. Luckily, there are a number of ways seniors can get their daily amount of exercise without having to run a marathon or lift weights at the gym.

Some exercise recommendations include:

  • Walking at a moderate to brisk pace
  • Seated or chair aerobics
  • Yoga
  • Lightweight strength-building exercise

It is recommended that seniors try to get at least 30 minutes of exercise in a day, but it doesn’t have to happen all at once. Exercise routines can be broken up into 5-minute or 10-minute increments. This makes exercise goals easier to reach, as it seems less intimidating.

Start Making Healthy Choices when it Comes to the Food You Eat

The food and drinks you consume on a daily basis dramatically increase or decrease your risk of diabetes. If you wish to reduce the risk of developing this disease, it is important to start making healthy food choices.

Some healthy food choice recommendations for seniors include:

  • Try to eliminate or reduce your intake of foods that are high in saturated fat, sugar and salt.
  • Reduce the amount of juices and sodas you drink and replace them with water.
  • Watch the amount of carbs that are consumed every meal, as carbs can increase blood sugar levels.
  • Reduce portion sizes.
  • Consider eating several small meals throughout the day, as opposed to two or three big meals.
  • Choose healthier snacks, such as nuts, fruits and vegetables.

Making dietary changes can be difficult, which is why there is help available. Many nutritionists offer group classes or individual sessions that focus on making healthy lifestyle choices that can help reduce your risk for diabetes.

Maintain a Healthy Weight or Work to Lose Weight

Excessive weight gain can increase your risk for diabetes because the body is unable to produce the natural insulin needed to break down glucose. It is important to either maintain your weight, if you are at a healthy weight, or lose weight if you wish to prevent Type 2 diabetes.

If you are overweight, losing anywhere from 5 to 10 pounds could dramatically decrease your risk for diabetes. The amount of weight you will need to lose will vary depending upon your unique situation. Speak with your doctor or health care provider to determine how much weight, if any, should be lost. He or she may be able to provide you with recommendations on how you can lose weight.

While following these recommendations may lessen your chances of getting diabetes, it may not completely stop it from happening. Some factors — such as other health problems, genetics and race — increase the possibility of diabetes. Unfortunately, these factors are uncontrollable and/or cannot be changed.

Even though there are some risk factors of diabetes that cannot be controlled, you can still dramatically minimize your risk of getting this disease by incorporating some, if not all, of these recommendations into your daily life.

Author Bio:

Thomas Boston founded Cash Now Offer as a way to help the diabetic community. Being a diabetic himself, his main goal is to make sure everyone who is in need of diabetic strips has access to them.

 

 

 

 

 

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By | April 6th, 2018|Categories: Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Guest Blog: Preventing Diabetes In Seniors

My not-bucket List

bigstock-Mature-Couple-In-A-Playful-Moo-5106837

Some people, when they get to be my age, make a bucket list – that is, those activities they would like to do before they die. Well, I decided to make a list of the things I don’t ever care to do and am happy that I haven’t done…so here is my short not-bucket list:

Go sky diving. While this might be one many people’s bucket list, I have no desire to go skydiving. I just can’t imagine that the euphoria at having survived jumping out of plane and relying on a parachute for my life would ever override the sheer terror of the falling feeling. In fact, I would probably have a heart attack and die of fright on the way down.

Own a snake. I hate snakes and would never call one a pet. I would always be worried that it would escape and I would find it in my shoes one day all dried up, or worse yet, that it would curl up in the shower or hide in my closet. A big snake might eat my little dog or cat. Snakes seem like tricky creatures that would give me nightmares. Nope, no snakes for me.

Smoke a cigarette. No, I have never smoked a cigarette. In fact, when I was about 8 years old and my Dad was once smoking a cigar, which he did only occasionally (being more of a pipe man himself), I wanted to be like him and try a smoke. Dad said okay, and told me to take a big deep breath to inhale that delicious cigar smoke. As you might imagine, the fitful coughing after that one drag, combined with his laughter, cured me of ever wanting to smoke anything – thus Dad’s lesson. He did, however, teach me great technique in stuffing his pipe, though not smoking one!

Go bungee jumping. Even if we set aside all the health hazards of having your hips and knees nearly yanked out of their sockets, your pelvis twisted and jolted, or the risks of having a stroke from all the blood rushing to your brain as you hang upside down, this is not appealing at all to me. Those with hiatal hernias or GERD should not put this on their bucket list. Similar to my feelings about sky diving, I just would not trust that the bungee cord would be strong enough or short enough to make it worth the thrill. Even with a go-pro camera to record the event, I’m sure that my screaming would overshadow any future comedic home movies that would come from it.

Get drunk.  I can’t see the attraction of getting drunk and not remembering what you did the night before. I guess that it makes for funny big screen movies, but vomiting all over the carpet and having to clean it up the next day when sober just doesn’t make it onto my list of anything remotely resembling fun. Besides, if I ever got inebriated, I would probably be found dancing on a table in a nightclub, make the evening news, and embarrass my kids to death.

Get a kidney stone.  I have already had one kidney stone and they are definitely not fun. I don’t care to have another, so I drink plenty of water throughout the day. It is true what they say, that the pain can be excruciating and intractable. Kidneys stones should be on the “avoid at all costs” list of everyone.

So, what’s on your not bucket list?

By | April 5th, 2018|Categories: Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on My not-bucket List