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CFO – Senior Care Central, LLC

Simple ways to make a bathroom fall proof

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The NIH Senior Health reports that one in three people over the age of 65 experience a fall each year. Because of the non-porous, easy clean surfaces, more than 80% of these falls happen in the bathroom. The proper equipment will help to keep everyone safer. Be sure to check your loved one’s for the following:

Grab Bars. One of the simplest solutions to preventing bathroom falls is to install grab bars. Choose bars that have a grip-like surface and contrast to the color of the shower, so they are easily visible. Anchor these bars to the studs behind the wall for the best support. Have your loved one step into the tub and show you where the best place to install a safety bar is located. Adding a grab bar next to the toilet is another simple way to prevent falls.

Non-Skid Surfaces. Placing a non-skid floor mat in front of the shower and sink soaks up excess water and prevents slips. Adding a non-skid shower mat to the bathtub will prevent your loved one from sliding on the slippery tub surface when bathing. For additional safety, place non-skid adhesive strips around the sink and vanity area.

Raised Toilet Seat. Adding a raised toilet seat prevents your loved one from losing her balance and falling while trying to sit on the toilet or get up. It is also helpful for those who are losing strength.

Lighting. Many seniors lose depth perception, having brighter lighting will help your senior to judge distances better, such as stepping into the bathtub. Adding motion lights on the path to the bathroom, as well as in the bathroom, will help your loved one to see where she is walking. Having plenty of lighting will help your loved one to locate toiletry items quicker and easier as well.

Declutter. Because many older people end up needing to use a walker or cane, it is important to make sure walking paths are clean and clutter-free. It is important to keep items such as towels off the floor and out of the way as much as possible. The less items your loved one can get hooked on, the safer the home will be.

Preventing a fall from happening is ideal. However, there are times when accidents happen. Consider getting your loved one a medical alert system as an additional layer of safety. The best systems offer waterproof pendants, so they can be worn while bathing. If your loved one does fall, she can press the button and get help immediately, which may save her life.

By | 2017-09-19T09:16:33+00:00 September 19th, 2017|Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Simple ways to make a bathroom fall proof

Guest Post: “Hitting a wall” – Why it is the biggest risk of marathon caring.

Running a marathon is one of the toughest things that you can do. Doing the full 26.2 miles requires grit, determination and a bit of luck. Luck in the sense that it reaches a point along the marathon whereby your will to run is gone and all you can do is hope that your body doesn’t give in. You require a lot of energy to run a marathon but the fact that it is a competitive event makes it difficult for stop and snack up. You, therefore, have to do with the food reserves stored in your body. The problem with this, however, is that the body can only store a limited amount of food reserves. This reserve is depleted way before you complete the marathon and it is at this point that the “wall” appears.

The wall.

To provide you with the energy to run, food is broken down to supply you with this energy. The primary food item that broken down to generate energy is carbohydrates since it requires very little oxygen to do so. When you are running, you let in very little oxygen into the blood stream and that is why carbohydrates are broken down first. The body can hold about 2000 calories of carbohydrates at any given time and this reserve can only last up to the 20th mile. From this point, the body turns to the fat deposits in the body for energy generation. Breaking down fats to produce energy generates a lot of waste products and this contaminates your interior. It also requires a lot of oxygen but since you are not taking in enough air, the body resorts to burning your muscles to generate the needed oxygen. This has the effect of making you feel like you are pulling a heavy load with your feet. Since your body is concentrating on generating energy, your focus shifts from running to this activity. You, therefore, find it difficult to concentrate on running and those who are not of strong will find it easy to give up.

Marathon caring and ‘The Wall”.

Aging brings with it a lot of challenges and at some stage in life, we would be expected to take care of our loved ones. It could be our parents, grandparents or other family members. Most would think that it will only be for a short period of time but the truth is that it usually stretches several years and this is what makes it a marathon. Taking care of another person is very challenging and it will overwhelm even those claiming to be strong willed. It requires that you feed, clothe as well as clean up the person under your care. You are in charge of their medication as well and this means that you have to monitor their pills to make sure they never run out. See how overwhelming that can be?

When compared to a marathon, all these responsibilities represent the various stages of a marathon. It is easier at the beginning since you are all psyched up and full of energy. It gets difficult with time as your ‘energy reserves’ are depleted and your enthusiasm fades. At this point, it is only a matter of time before you ‘hit the wall’.

The wall of a marathon caregiver.

The wall to a marathon caregiver represents that point when you see your dependent as a burden. This is that point when you are no longer excited to see those in your care. The wall is a very difficult point since it could see you neglect those in your care.

Keeping the wall at bay.

There are a few things that you can do to keep the way at bay. The first thing is to understand the course and this entails understanding your dependents better. If they have any illnesses, get to understand them as this will make it easy for you to manage them. Learn how to take care of old people and you can do that by checking out care homes near me. This will make you a better care giver and better equipment to avoid the wall.

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By | 2017-09-07T09:16:41+00:00 September 6th, 2017|Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Guest Post: “Hitting a wall” – Why it is the biggest risk of marathon caring.

Guest Blog: What to Expect from Andropause in Your Senior Years

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Have you felt like your increasing age is taking a toll on you? As men increase in age, their normal hormone levels decrease and result in different types of male hormone imbalances. One of which is andropause or “male menopause” – a decline in a man’s levels of testosterone, their primary male sex hormone.

A gradual but significant decline in a man’s testosterone begins at age 30 at a rate of 1 to 2% per year. By about  age 70, a man’s testosterone levels may have declined by 50%. Because testosterone plays a huge role in a man’s overall health, low T levels may produce different adverse effects.

 

Andropause and senior health

Here are the most common symptoms and changes you can expect from andropause in your senior years:

  • Sleep disturbances: Sleeping difficulties or disturbances in andropause men include insomnia, sleep apnea, night sweats, and restless leg syndrome (RLS).
  • Emotional changes: Different changes in emotions during andropause often result to a lack of motivation, depression, forgetfulness, and lack of concentration.
  • Sexual dysfunction: During andropause, a man’s sexual function also weakens and lays low, which may result in low sex drive, infertility, and erectile dysfunction.
  • Osteoporosis: With declining testosterone levels, men become more susceptible to osteoporosis. Low levels of testosterone lead to loss of bone tissue and mass.
  • Physical changes: Other physical manifestations of andropause in men include increased abdominal fat, decreased muscle mass, hair loss, and swollen breasts.

Dealing with andropause

Although andropause can’t be escaped, it can be managed. Men can deal with the different symptoms and risks brought about by andropause with these simple steps:

  • Weight management: Stored extra fat, especially in the belly, can convert testosterone to estradiol. Healthier lifestyle choices such as proper diet and regular exercise are greatly recommended.
  • Physical activity: Engaging in physical activities can help alleviate unpleasant symptoms of andropause, such as mood swings and sleeping difficulties, while helping manage your weight.
  • Proper nutrition: Practice eating healthier food choices including fiber-rich foods, omega-3 fatty acids, lean meat, and fruits and vegetables for overall health, increased energy, and strength.
  • Getting checked for depression: Depression is one of the symptoms of andropause that you should keep an eye on. Beware of signs of depression or have your primary care provider screen you for possible depression.
  • Expert consultation: The best way to deal with andropause is through an expert doctor’s help. Be honest about your symptoms for proper diagnosis and treatment. For some, testosterone replacement therapy can be given as an effective treatment.

Get equipped and be ready for the andropause battle!

 

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By | 2017-09-05T08:21:59+00:00 September 5th, 2017|Dr. Mauk's Boomer Blog, News Posts|Comments Off on Guest Blog: What to Expect from Andropause in Your Senior Years
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